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Revision as of 19:45, 16 September 2012

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This is the site for 6.034 Artificial Intelligence, Fall 2012, with Professor Patrick Winston.

Logistical stuff:

Reference stuff:

  • Labs (also known as "problem sets")

In the fall semester of 2012, 6.034 will meet Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10 to 11. Most, but not all of Professor Winston's lectures will be on Monday and Wednesday. On most, but not all Fridays, you will learn about what is happening in the field right now from someone who is doing work right now in an area related to the Monday and Wednesday lectures.

Examinations will cover material from the traditional lectures as well as the right-now lectures. It will be extremely difficult to field questions on the right-now material if you do not attend the right-now lectures because the material is not yet in textbooks or, in many cases, published papers.

Tutorials will meet weekly on Monday and Tuesday. On the first day of class, you will fill out a form that will enable us to assign you to a tutorial.

There will be no recitations; you should ignore what the registrar has scheduled.

More details will emerge during the first lecture on Wednesday, September 5.



5 September 2011

Lab 0 is released. Click on Labs link above.

If you were unable to give us a tutorial scheduling form, please fill out and bring to 32-251 as soon as practicable. If you can bring it today, you will be in the initial assignment list.

We inadvertently scheduled the first quiz for Yom Kippur. For students celebrating the Jewish Holiday, the quiz will be scheduled for Friday, 28 September.

4 September 2011

Registrar promises to schedule final by 5:00 PM on September 20, 2012.

3 September 2011

There is no Friday lecture this week.


The official language of 6.034 is Python for a variety of reasons having little to do with the strengths and weaknesses of the language. We expect a focused weekend with any of the many Python books would be adequate preparation. See, for example, the Amazon list.

Alternatively, you can follow one of the suggestions:

  • Notes that have been used in 6.00 has been expanded into a book called Think Python. It's online. It is targeted at people who have not programmed much or at all.
  • Another choice is the O'Reilly book Learning Python. MIT has a subscription to O'Reilly, so anyone with an MIT IP address can read the book online.

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